SCENARIO QUIZ

After viewing this video as many times as you wish, simply write your answers to the questions below. You won't be sending them to us, just creating a record for yourself for when you compare your responses to ours by following the link at the end of question #17. We hope you find this exercise to be beneficial.
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1. We instructed you to obtain your firearm before opening the door to the garage. As an adult in the state in which you live, are you allow you to do so while realizing the possibility that you might encounter a stranger?




2. Would you have investigated the noise if you did not have a firearm?




3. What other options for the resolution of this situation could you have employed prior to opening the door to the garage?




4. Did you consider verbally warning anyone who might have been inside the garage before making your entry? Describe the benefits and risks of doing so.




5. The camera had you open the door to the garage while standing upright. Do you consider this to be the best posture?




6. Describe other entry postures/actions and briefly the benefits of each.




7. At what point upon seeing the intruder would you have aimed your firearm at him and why then?




8. What, if any, would be your initial verbal commands to the intruder?




9. Would your verbal commands change once the intruder got the pipe, and if so, describe how?




10. Describe the boundary of protected airspace around yourself and the action you would have taken in this instance as the intruder entered that boundary.




11. Would you have shot at the intruder, and if so, at what point would you have begun firing?




12. If the intruder was unarmed, but charged you as he did, would you have shot at him? Why or why not?




13. Where on his body were you placing your shots and why?




14. When would you have stopped shooting?




15. Upon seeing the intruder, what options other than shooting could you have exercised?




16. Without looking again at the scenario (cheating), describe the intruder.




17. At what point would you consider that you began to use lethal force against the intruder?





Nicely done. Now that you have your answers recorded, you can compare them to our discussion by clicking here. You'll find that you can toggle between your answers and our discussions.
1. We instructed you to obtain your firearm before opening the door to the garage. As an adult in the state in which you live, are you allow you to do so while realizing the possibility that you might encounter a stranger?

Your state's statutes prevail in these cases. You must read and understand them.

2. Would you have investigated the noise if you did not have a firearm?

This is a personal choice, but having deadly force available should not cause you to be more bold in your investigation than you might otherwise be. This is a mind-set that only you can determine. As a matter of judgment--not necessarily the law--you want to be careful to not be "going hunting" when you have a gun in your hand.

3. What other options for the resolution of this situation could you have employed prior to opening the door to the garage?

In fact, the definition of judgment is "the analysis of options, followed by an action." You could call 911 from within the home, you could leave the home and investigate from outside, you could go to a neighbor and call 911, you could do nothing and assume you didn't really hear anything strange. All options have benefits and risks. And the exercise of an option has one of two results: increasing the availability of future options, or decreasing the availability of future options. An increase is always a good thing.

4. Did you consider verbally warning anyone who might have been inside the garage before making your entry? Describe the benefits and risks of doing so.

If your intent was to scare away without going into the garage anyone who was in the garage, you might give that a try and then listen at the door. You won't know if you succeed, however, until you conduct some kind of investigation. A verbal warning might do the trick, or it might alert the intruder(s) of your location only to now make you a matter of more interest for the intruder(s). There is no right/wrong here, just again, options to consider during an event.

5. The camera had you open the door to the garage while standing upright. Do you consider this to be the best posture?

Probably the worst considering that the doorway frames your body perfectly thereby making you an easy target.

6. Describe other entry postures/actions and briefly the benefits of each.

Assuming you know your garage layout, there's nothing like going in quickly and being a moving target. On the other hand, you don't know what you're literally running into. Being low in the doorway--whether opening the door quickly or slowly--is probably not being anticipated by an intruder and might give you an advantage to avoid a round going into the space that your chest might occupy if you were standing upright. But just know that whatever you do to enter the garage, you've gone from a place of safety into a place of danger. There are risks in doing so. Another thing to consider: Ask yourself what you would do in this situation if you didn't have a gun. (That can often be the best thing to survive.)

7. At what point upon seeing the intruder would you have aimed your firearm at him and why then?

Some might not take aim until the intruder obtained a weapon. Others would have taken aim instantly. Remember that your state's statutes obligate you in certain ways.

8. What, if any, would be your initial verbal commands to the intruder?

Your verbal commands should command the intruder as to how the person must act to not be more of a threat than what they are now. Sometimes the action is so fast that there simply is no opportunity for verbalization. In this case there was, but don't get focused on conversation coming from the aggressor. It's the action coming from the intruder that counts, not the words. And this is no time for verbal exchange--just commands.

9. Would your verbal commands change once the intruder got the pipe, and if so, describe how?

Maybe not. If your first verbal was "get out of my garage, don't come any closer," that remains a good command whether or not the intruder picked up the pipe. "Drop the pipe" might be a good command, but then what happens to your brain if he does drop it, yet keeps advancing? You don't want to be in a position of adding to a list things to command, yet most of us would probably address the pipe.

10. Describe the boundary of protected airspace around yourself and the action you would have taken in this instance as the intruder entered that boundary.

Your comfort level might be different, but there's certainly no reason in the face of good verbal commands from you for the intruder to come any closer than the front of the car.

11. Would you have shot at the intruder, and if so, at what point would you have begun firing?

Certainly, you could have exited the garage back through the door you entered and then continued retreating to a safer place to defend. That's an option. Standing your ground certainly puts you in a situation in which you'd likely use your gun. Some might have begun firing immediately upon seeing the intruder, others when he picked up the pipe, others when he came around the front of the car. (Analysis of options followed by an action--you may need to justify your actions.)

12. If the intruder was unarmed, but charged you as he did, would you have shot at him? Why or why not?

Regardless of how you answered remember this; you've got a gun that you can't let the intruder have. This is why you established the boundary of protected airspace. You have a gun, he sees it, he wants it. That would be a huge problem for you.

13. Where on his body were you placing your shots and why?

No matter how you answered, you need the skill to accomplish your objective of defense. "Center mass area of the torso" gives you the biggest target. Ultimately, what you want is a behavior change from the intruder and once achieved there would be little reason to keep firing.

14. When would you have stopped shooting?

One of the problems we see in the simulator from students who have only target practice experience, is that they stop shooting after an arbitrary number of rounds. There isn't a realization that there's an objective to employing deadly force during self defense. So, really, one answer is that you stop firing only when there is no longer a threat, or upon realizing that you've made a serious mistake.

15. Upon seeing the intruder, what options other than shooting could you have exercised?

You've got really two options: fight or flee.

16. Without looking again at the scenario (cheating), describe the intruder.

Yea. Right.

17. At what point would you consider that you began to use lethal force against the intruder?

​Considering that in some other circumstances there could be against a defender a charge of "assault with a deadly weapon," there is a case to be made in almost all instances that one began using lethal force immediately upon making the firearm visible to another.


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